Barite
Barite
Barite

Yellow Coxcomb Barite







Chemical Symbol: BaSO4
Cleveage: 1,1 basal; 2,1; prismatic; 3,1 pinacoidal
Composition: Barium Sulfate, Sometimes/Rarely with small amounts strontium
Colors: Colorless, white, yellow, orange, red, brown, blue, and gray and sometimes multicolored.
Streak(s): white
Hardness: 3- 3 1/2
Transparency: Transparent to translucent in thin streaks/places
Luster: Vitreous, to Pearly
Fracture: It is uneven and it’s very brittle. It can be a various amount of different colors and sometimes has a streak of white or no color at all. It can be semi-transparent (can kind of see through it), however sometimes you can't see through it.
How it forms: Barite forms in hot springs.
Gravity: 4.3 - 4.6

external image Barite.JPG

Vitreous: Glass Like appearence or texture
Translucent: Allowing light to pass through diffusely
Luster: Is a way the light interacts with the mineral, or rock
Cleveage: Is the state of being split; or cleft
Strontium: A soft silver-white mineral element
Brittle: Having little elasticity and very delacate




Crystal shape: Orthorhombic

Animated figure of orthorhombic crystal system
Animated figure of orthorhombic crystal system


Orthorhombic is a crystal shape that has 3 axes and all are unequal in length. The three axes are at a 90 degree angle to each other.

How to identify Barite: A few of the eaisest ways to tell if a rock is Barite is its shape, hardness, cleveage, color and fracture.

Barite
Barite


Examples:

1.

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2.
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3.
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4.
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5.
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1. Colorless, transparent Barite 2. White, coxcomb Barite with Chalcopyrite 3. Barite Desert Rose
4. Green, Prismatic Barite 5. Tabular orange crystals




Uses of Barite
  • Glass
  • Paper
  • Rubber
  • Textiles
  • Linoleum
  • Paints
  • Radiology

Work cited:
Chesterman, Charles. "Barite." field guide to rocks and minerals. twenty-fourth. Syracuse, New york: Library of congress cataloging-in-, 1979. print.
www.minerals.net

http://www.minerals.net/mineral/sulfates/barite/barite.htm
http://webmineral.com/data/Barite.shtml

Link to look at some more information is at: http://highlighter7.glogster.com/sciencewiki.com

Barite is used in oil rigging, clinches, cars, trucks, buses, and break pads.
<3 makes sure to look at the link up there :)